Improve recuperation with the sports nutrition ReWin(d) active

Published On:
September 05, 2019
Published In:
Nutraceutical Industry

While certain plants are recognised for their analgesic or stimulating effect [1], it is difficult to scientifically demonstrate the effects [2].

To prove the effectiveness of the new sports nutrition ReWin(d) active, Natural Origins conducted a clinical trial.

Results show that ReWin(d) not only reduces soreness but also improves sports performances by considerably reducing the recuperation time following an intense physical effort.

Focus on results highlighted by the clinical trial.

 

1. Measure muscular inflammation and DOMS* (delayed onset muscle soreness) with and without the ReWin(d) active

 

Two groups of volunteers did the same exercises: one including a combination of pylometric movements and CMJ (countermovement jump), and the other eccentric movements. The objective was to simulate intense physical exercise leading to the onset of DOMS*, which appear between 24 to 72 hours following intensive muscular exercise [3].

The results of the clinical study show that delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) disappear more quickly with subjects having been administered ReWin(d). In effect, while leg muscles for the placebo group keep the same inflammation level after 24, 48 and 72 hours, a substantial decrease in inflammation is noted after 48 hours in the case of the ReWin(d) subjects. Moreover, inflammation continues to decrease at the end of 72 hours, proving that  ReWin(d) enables considerably reducing recuperation time following intense physical exercise.

 

2. Pain reduction thanks to the ReWin(d) active

 

Inflammation is necessarily accompanied by pain. The doctors in charge of this clinical study thus studied the perception of pain using 2 tests: an evaluation of dynamic pain and static pain.

An increase in dynamic pain was observed with the placebo and logically was stable in the case of ReWin(d). Static pain was still present at the end of 72 hours with the placebo whereas it had disappeared at the end of 48 hours with ReWin(d).[AM1]

ReWin(d) thus has an analgesic effect.

 

3. Improved sports performance and cardiac variability

 

Performances were evaluated by using a test to measure the height of jumps. Athletes using placebos returned to their original level of performance after 72 hours.  On the contrary, an increase in performance was noted with those athletes using ReWin(d) after 24, 48 and 72 hours. The effect observed with regard to inflammation logically improves performance.

Heart rate variability was measured and likewise confirmed this increase in performance. This parameter is a recognised marker for well-trained athletes.

The heart rate variability for athletes using ReWin(d) was higher after 24 hours compared to athletes using placebos. This difference was still noticeable after 48 hours.

This demonstrates that the return to the original level is faster with ReWin(d) and thus enables decreasing recuperation time between 2 physical efforts.

 

Conclusion

 

ReWin(d) has a significant effect on muscular inflammation and on local pain.

Athletes using  ReWin(d) tend to recuperate better as heart rate variability (HRV) returns to its original level within 72 hours.

Finally, as ReWin(d) eases DOMS, it enables athletes to do one training set after another thanks to a reduced recuperation time and thus improve their performances.

 

Feel free to contact our Botanical Studio experts to answer your questions and assist you in the formulation of your sports nutrition products.

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*DOMS : Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

 

Sources:

[1] Patrick B.Wilson. “Ginger (Zingiber officinale) as an Analgesic and Ergogenic Aid in Sport: A Systemic Review”. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: October 2015 - Volume 29 - Issue 10 - p 2980–2995. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001098

[2] Pr Michel Rieu. “Comment définir le pouvoir ergogénique d’une substance ?”. 13ème Colloque national de lutte et de prévention du dopage. Résumé : https://www.franceolympique.com/files/File/actions/sante/colloques/13eme/comment_defenir_le_pouvoir.pdf

 [3] Coudreuse et al. “Douleurs musculaires post-effort/Delayed onset muscle soreness”. Journal de Traumatologie du Sport 24 (2007) 103 – 110. Doi : 10.1016/j.jts.2007.03.006

 

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Marc Roller, PhD

Marc Roller, PhD

CEO & Partner Natural Origins - Head of Innovation

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